Best Thanksgiving Turkey Recipe Ever - Thanksgiving 2020 - History, Meaning, Quotes, Message, Food
If you're tired of the same Thanksgiving food that you make year after year and you want to kick things up a notch from this menu is for you. We're going to kick things off with my brine turkey roulade with herb walnut pesto.


Then I'll show you how to make a delicious homemade cranberry sauce that comes together in minutes for an impressive thanksgiving side dishes. It's Duchess Potatoes, an elegant looking potato that is sure to impress. 



Then it's sauteed Brussel sprouts with crispy prosciutto, and roasted hazelnuts served in a warm balsamic glaze. And for dessert, it's pumpkin crumble, topped with homemade whipped cream, candy, pecans, and ginger snap crumbs. Now, if this thanksgiving menu looks good.

Turkey Roulade with Herb Walnut Pesto


If you live in one of those homes where everybody only eats the white meat of a turkey, then a turkey breast roulade is for you. A roulade is basically any type of meat that has been rolled and tied and then roasted. What's nice about a roulade is it provides an opportunity to fill the inside of it with all kinds of filling stuff. 

You can do herbs. And in our case, we're going to do an herb walnut pesto with our Willott. We want to make sure that we get beautiful crispy skin on the outside, but also retain a really moist inside. And one of the ways we're going to ensure that is with brine. 



A Brine is going to help your turkey retain water, which is going to give you a moist turkey. So it's definitely a step worth doing. Sometimes a challenge with brine is to find a vessel big enough to hold at least a gallon of water plus your turkey. 

And for me, I find the thing that works the best is one of those large canisters. It's glass, it'll hold water. And the nice thing is there's a lid on it. 



You're going to add -

  • A gallon of water.
  • Half a cup of salt.
  • A half a cup of sugar.
  • Then four sprigs of rosemary.
  • Four sprigs of thyme.
  • A tablespoon of peppercorns.
  • One onion that's been quartered.
  • Head of garlic that's also been quartered.
  • and Some Bay Leaves.


Just give that a good stir until all the sugar and salt are dissolved. You're going to submerge your turkey breast in the brine and then refrigerate a good brine usually needs at least six hours to do the trick. But what I usually will do is the day before Thanksgiving in the afternoon, prepare the turkey brine Pop in my fridge and let it sit overnight.

Herb Walnut Pesto




Then it's time to make your herb walnut pesto in a food processor. You're going to combine parsley, sage, rosemary, walnuts, half a clove of garlic and salt and pepper. Pulse that up just until it's sweet and finally mixed. 

Then you're slowly going to add the olive oil pulsing all the while until you get a sweet paste. And then the final step is the zest of one lemon mix that all together and then your pesto is done.



Then you're going to prep your turkey breast, remove it from the brine, and it's going to be soaking wet. You want to make sure that you get that turkey breast very, very dry. Otherwise, your turkey is going to steam up in the oven, and it's not going to crisp. 



Now, one thing to know is you do not need to season your turkey anymore at this point. The brine has kept it perfectly seasoned. So do not add any more salt or pepper. You could end up with a turkey that's too salty. 

Then you're going to make the pesto and put it under the skin, making sure that you get all of that pesto nicely incorporated on the breasts of the turkey. Then you're going to flip it over and do the same thing, just covering the turkey breast as much as you can with the pesto. 



Now, here comes the fun part. We need to roll this turkey up just like a jelly roll all the way until we create an excellent cylinder. And at this point, I kind of cheat a little bit. I know that there are very special ways to tie up a roast.  But for me, when it comes to Turkey breast, they're really unruly, and I like to just tie it in single knots all the way down. 



I know that there are chefs out there that are probably rolling their eyes at me, but I'm telling you, it's a lot easier when you work with a turkey breast. You're then going to take your turkey roll and transfer it to a sheet pan lined with a rack. 



Then we're going to add our basting mixture, which will become the basis of a beautiful pan sauce. Once the turkey is done, you're going to add a cup of chicken stock and half a cup of white wine.



If you don't drink, just replace that with more chicken stuff. Then you're going to add three sprigs of rosemary and two babies.



And then the final step is to brush that turkey with some melted butter mixed with chopped sage and chopped parsley pop it in the oven at 400 degrees.



And just check it every 15 minutes. You want to make sure that you continue to baste it and make sure that that skin is turning golden brown. You also want to insert your meat thermometer and make sure that you keep an eye on it because you want to pull that turkey out once it reaches one hundred and sixty-five degrees.



As the turkey cools and rests on your countertop, it will come up to one hundred and seventy degrees, which in my opinion, is really the perfect temperature for Turkey.

While your turkey rests, you can prep your pan gravy, just remove the rosemary sprigs and the bay leaves. Strain the gravy and put it back into a saucepan.



At this point, the only thing you really need to add is about a tablespoon of Dijon mustard. Allow it to simmer and check it for seasoning. If it needs a little salt, just add a little salt and pepper to taste.

Then you want to go back to your turkey and snip off the butcher's twine, you will see that as that Turkey cooked, it actually retained its shape.



So it'll make it a lot easier to carve, carve the turkey, place it on a platter, and then I like to garnish it with some fresh sage.



Then moments before you serve it, you can spoon out a little of that pan gravy on top of your turkey. That will help keep it moist while you bring it to the table. I love this recipe because it's easy, and it's also elegant.



The addition of those fresh herbs and the lemon zest just give that turkey an exciting flavor combination, something unexpected that your guests may not have tried. So if you're looking for something a little extra special this year, definitely try a turkey breast roulade.

Best Thanksgiving Turkey Recipe Ever

If you're tired of the same Thanksgiving food that you make year after year and you want to kick things up a notch from this menu is for you. We're going to kick things off with my brine turkey roulade with herb walnut pesto.


Then I'll show you how to make a delicious homemade cranberry sauce that comes together in minutes for an impressive thanksgiving side dishes. It's Duchess Potatoes, an elegant looking potato that is sure to impress. 



Then it's sauteed Brussel sprouts with crispy prosciutto, and roasted hazelnuts served in a warm balsamic glaze. And for dessert, it's pumpkin crumble, topped with homemade whipped cream, candy, pecans, and ginger snap crumbs. Now, if this thanksgiving menu looks good.

Turkey Roulade with Herb Walnut Pesto


If you live in one of those homes where everybody only eats the white meat of a turkey, then a turkey breast roulade is for you. A roulade is basically any type of meat that has been rolled and tied and then roasted. What's nice about a roulade is it provides an opportunity to fill the inside of it with all kinds of filling stuff. 

You can do herbs. And in our case, we're going to do an herb walnut pesto with our Willott. We want to make sure that we get beautiful crispy skin on the outside, but also retain a really moist inside. And one of the ways we're going to ensure that is with brine. 



A Brine is going to help your turkey retain water, which is going to give you a moist turkey. So it's definitely a step worth doing. Sometimes a challenge with brine is to find a vessel big enough to hold at least a gallon of water plus your turkey. 

And for me, I find the thing that works the best is one of those large canisters. It's glass, it'll hold water. And the nice thing is there's a lid on it. 



You're going to add -

  • A gallon of water.
  • Half a cup of salt.
  • A half a cup of sugar.
  • Then four sprigs of rosemary.
  • Four sprigs of thyme.
  • A tablespoon of peppercorns.
  • One onion that's been quartered.
  • Head of garlic that's also been quartered.
  • and Some Bay Leaves.


Just give that a good stir until all the sugar and salt are dissolved. You're going to submerge your turkey breast in the brine and then refrigerate a good brine usually needs at least six hours to do the trick. But what I usually will do is the day before Thanksgiving in the afternoon, prepare the turkey brine Pop in my fridge and let it sit overnight.

Herb Walnut Pesto




Then it's time to make your herb walnut pesto in a food processor. You're going to combine parsley, sage, rosemary, walnuts, half a clove of garlic and salt and pepper. Pulse that up just until it's sweet and finally mixed. 

Then you're slowly going to add the olive oil pulsing all the while until you get a sweet paste. And then the final step is the zest of one lemon mix that all together and then your pesto is done.



Then you're going to prep your turkey breast, remove it from the brine, and it's going to be soaking wet. You want to make sure that you get that turkey breast very, very dry. Otherwise, your turkey is going to steam up in the oven, and it's not going to crisp. 



Now, one thing to know is you do not need to season your turkey anymore at this point. The brine has kept it perfectly seasoned. So do not add any more salt or pepper. You could end up with a turkey that's too salty. 

Then you're going to make the pesto and put it under the skin, making sure that you get all of that pesto nicely incorporated on the breasts of the turkey. Then you're going to flip it over and do the same thing, just covering the turkey breast as much as you can with the pesto. 



Now, here comes the fun part. We need to roll this turkey up just like a jelly roll all the way until we create an excellent cylinder. And at this point, I kind of cheat a little bit. I know that there are very special ways to tie up a roast.  But for me, when it comes to Turkey breast, they're really unruly, and I like to just tie it in single knots all the way down. 



I know that there are chefs out there that are probably rolling their eyes at me, but I'm telling you, it's a lot easier when you work with a turkey breast. You're then going to take your turkey roll and transfer it to a sheet pan lined with a rack. 



Then we're going to add our basting mixture, which will become the basis of a beautiful pan sauce. Once the turkey is done, you're going to add a cup of chicken stock and half a cup of white wine.



If you don't drink, just replace that with more chicken stuff. Then you're going to add three sprigs of rosemary and two babies.



And then the final step is to brush that turkey with some melted butter mixed with chopped sage and chopped parsley pop it in the oven at 400 degrees.



And just check it every 15 minutes. You want to make sure that you continue to baste it and make sure that that skin is turning golden brown. You also want to insert your meat thermometer and make sure that you keep an eye on it because you want to pull that turkey out once it reaches one hundred and sixty-five degrees.



As the turkey cools and rests on your countertop, it will come up to one hundred and seventy degrees, which in my opinion, is really the perfect temperature for Turkey.

While your turkey rests, you can prep your pan gravy, just remove the rosemary sprigs and the bay leaves. Strain the gravy and put it back into a saucepan.



At this point, the only thing you really need to add is about a tablespoon of Dijon mustard. Allow it to simmer and check it for seasoning. If it needs a little salt, just add a little salt and pepper to taste.

Then you want to go back to your turkey and snip off the butcher's twine, you will see that as that Turkey cooked, it actually retained its shape.



So it'll make it a lot easier to carve, carve the turkey, place it on a platter, and then I like to garnish it with some fresh sage.



Then moments before you serve it, you can spoon out a little of that pan gravy on top of your turkey. That will help keep it moist while you bring it to the table. I love this recipe because it's easy, and it's also elegant.



The addition of those fresh herbs and the lemon zest just give that turkey an exciting flavor combination, something unexpected that your guests may not have tried. So if you're looking for something a little extra special this year, definitely try a turkey breast roulade.

Comments